Protecting Wyoming Public Wildlands

OUR  MISSION

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ABOUT WWA

Our mission is to protect Wyoming's public wildlands.

WWA is a non-profit conservation group that began in 1979 as a group of local wilderness advocates who envisioned the passage of the Wyoming Wilderness Act.  This small volunteer, grassroots group began educating, training, and organizing Wyoming citizens to secure the passage of the 1984 Wyoming Wilderness Act. The Act permanently protected 1.1 million acres of ecologically diverse, wild landscapes. WWA was re-started and incorporated with the State of Wyoming in 1994 to serve as a local voice for the protection of Wilderness and roadless areas.  As of 2020, WWA has 4,500 members and supporters. Their voice gives us the inspiration to continue to strive for a wild Wyoming!

Take Action

keep the

red desert wild

Wyoming’s Northern Red Desert is a vast expanse of public lands composed of sand dunes, badlands, canyons, and immense open spaces all scattered beneath a shattering blue sky. Bisected by the Oregon Trail and the longest mule deer migration corridor on Earth, this landscape contains cultural and historical sites for Indigenous peoples and early western pioneers, vital wildlife habitat, and incredible opportunities for recreation and reflection in absolute solitude.

ENjoy a
Cup of Coffee!

WWA has partnered with Motive Coffee Company of Laramie, WY to create a morning blend! Wyoming's wild places were the muse and the taste evokes the serenity of untouched vistas. You can find a bag at Big Hollow Food Co-Op, and very soon we will have online sales available. Motive is very generously donating a portion of the proceeds to WWA, which will go directly to our stewardship programs

Sign up for our mailing list

Sign up for our mailing list to stay in the loop on opportunities to protect and enjoy Wyoming public wildlands. We only contact you about important things, we promise to not spam you!

We will keep you up to date on news and events around Wyoming wildlands, like Backcountry Film festival, outing and stewardship opportunities, and exclusive offers from our partners around the state.

Wyoming Wilderness Association would like to recognize that public wildlands are Native lands, and that more than twenty indigeneous tribes are connected to Wyoming including, the Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Lakota, Dakota and Nakota bands), Hinono’ei (Arapaho), Sáhniš (Arikara), Panati (Bannock), Niitsitapi (Blackfeet), Tsistsistas (Cheyenne), Apsaalooké (Crow), A'aninin (Gros Ventre), [Gáuigú (Kiowa), Nimi'ipuu (Nez Perce), Tukudeka (Sheep Eater), Newe (Shoshone) and Núu-agha-tʉvʉ-pʉ̱ (Ute). These tribes were forcibly and often violently removed from the areas where Wyoming’s public wildlands and communities now exist. 


Our main office is located in Sheridan, WY on land of the Apsaalooké, Tsistsistas, and Očhéthi Šakówiŋ people. The Sheridan area’s land was originally promised to be the reservation designated for the Northern Arapaho Band. This agreement was never confirmed or ratified, leaving the Northern Arapaho with no designated land for their reservation and placed indefinitely on the Shoshone Reservation, which is now the Wind River Indian Reservation. 


We respect all native people’s historic, present, and future presence in Wyoming and across the country. Far too often native people are discussed as relics of the past, rather than vital members of living cultures with the ability to offer keystone perspectives and wisdom regarding a path forward. We value the indigenous commitment to land stewardship that has kept our wildernesses pristine for generations to enjoy, and acknowledge that the wildlands we protect today were far from vacant of a human presence before the anglo-american arrival. We seek the involvement and advocacy from Wyoming’s original land inhabitants and stewards in the work we do. 


WWA would lastly like to admit that this land acknowledgement, as well as our commitment to engaging Native peoples in our work is far from perfect. We welcome and encourage all feedback and suggestions.