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PROGRAMS

 

Banff Centre Mountain Film Festival - Virtual

Available online starting November 25, 2021.

More monthly features and film programs will be added throughout the year, bringing adventures & stories to a couch near you!

Currently available programs:

Sage Program | $15

Pine Program | $15

Bundle both programs for $28

YOUTH AMBASSADORS FOR WILDERNESS

YAW is a summer program designed for high school students interested in becoming the next generation of conservation leaders. The curriculum focuses on expanding participants' knowledge of Wyoming's wild places through advocacy and stewardship.

 
 

OUTDOOR CLUBS

Outdoor clubs help students discover intrinsic value of wild places.

Wyoming Wilderness Association believes that providing youth outdoor activity opportunities develops an informed voice and an understanding of public land value. Teaching students how to recreate responsibly, appreciate wild places, and give back to their community is critical in the protection of these precious landscapes for future generations.

WWA has teamed up with three teachers to launch an outdoors club at three Sheridan County High Schools, Sheridan High School, Big Horn High School, and Tongue River High School. This program provides students with low cost outdoor recreation that connects them with their mountainous backyard. The three main components: environmental education, stewardship work, and recreation work to get students to actively participate in recognizing the characteristics and values of our wild places. Our volunteer teachers share their expertise on subjects connected with the day’s outdoor activity, such as the geology of the rock the club is about to climb. Stewardship projects are coordinated as well, such as cleaning the trail up to where they will climb. While learning about and caring for the surrounding environment, students participate in outdoor pursuits including hiking, climbing, mountain biking, fly fishing, cross-country and alpine skiing, many for the first time.

Getting our local high school students outside adventuring, learning, and giving back to our community helps them discover the intrinsic values of these wild landscapes. And when it is their turn to engage in management decision-making, they will have a story to share. 

RUN THE RED

The Wyoming Wilderness Association, The National Outdoor Leadership School, and the Wyoming Outdoor Council invite runners, supporters, family and friends to experience the wild expanses of the Red Desert at Run the Red. Originally conceived to honor the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act of 1964 and the 30th anniversary of the Wyoming Wilderness Act, Run the Red is Wyoming’s premier ultra and half marathon race dedicated to conserving the vast, rugged and historical landscape of the Red Desert. With race distances of 100K, 50K and half marathon, runners of all courses will experience one of the last undeveloped high desert steppe ecosystems in the nation while celebrating this remarkable landscape for its open spaces, Wyoming heritage, wildlife and recreational benefits. Taking place on Saturday, September 24 – Wyoming Public Lands Day – this race will begin outside historic South Pass City, and traverse the landscape towards the Oregon and Honeycomb Buttes Wilderness Study Areas. Runners will follow the Oregon and Mormon Trails along the continental divide while passing through a maze of badlands, buttes, canyons, and miles of wild open country.  Join us this September at Run the Red, the race for a wild Wyoming landscape. 

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Wyoming Wilderness Association would like to recognize that public wildlands are Native lands, and that more than twenty indigenous tribes are connected to Wyoming including, the Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Lakota, Dakota and Nakota bands), Hinono’ei (Arapaho), Sáhniš (Arikara), Panati (Bannock), Niitsitapi (Blackfeet), Tsistsistas (Cheyenne), Apsaalooké (Crow), A'aninin (Gros Ventre), [Gáuigú (Kiowa), Nimi'ipuu (Nez Perce), Tukudeka (Sheep Eater), Newe (Shoshone) and Núu-agha-tʉvʉ-pʉ̱ (Ute). These tribes were forcibly and often violently removed from the areas where Wyoming’s public wildlands and communities now exist. 


WWA would lastly like to admit that this land acknowledgement, as well as our commitment to engaging Native peoples in our work is far from perfect. We welcome and encourage all feedback and suggestions.